Six Minds and Petroleum Technology

The Journal of Petroleum Technology recently published a piece by David Goldberg on how the Six Minds of a Whole New Engineer can be applied to the petroleum industry:

Petroleum engineers have played a pivotal role in the rise of the modern engineer, and they can once again join hands to rejuvenate their own discipline and engineering as a thriving whole.

Read the full article, here.

A Whole New Engineer Ready for Pre-Order on Amazon & 800-CEO-READ

The book, A Whole New Engineer: The Coming Revolution in Engineering Education is available for pre-order on Amazon or for bulk orders at  800CEOread.com.

  • Amazon: Pre-order here.
  • 800-CEO-Read: Bulk-order here

See the link here about the making of the book (here), a press release from Olin College (here), and an early review of the book by Gary Bertoline at Purdue University (here).  

For more information about the book write to Dave Goldberg (deg@threejoy.com).

Olin Announces Distinguished Academic Partner

Franklin W. Olin College announced ThreeJoy Associates president, Dave Goldberg as a distinguished academic partner (here).

“We are extremely fortunate to have someone with the creativity and passion of Dr. Goldberg working with us in our efforts to change engineering education,” said Vincent P. Manno, provost and dean of faculty at Olin College. “He believes, as we do, that student passion, courage, and initiative are the forces that will bring about the needed change, and we welcome him as an ally and colleague.”

Goldberg joins MIT’s Woodie Flowers in this role (here).

An Engineering Education Tops Disciplinary ROI

CNNMoney reports that of the 15 top college majors, ten are in disciplines of engineering or engineering technology.  Here’s the list and the associated salaries:

  1. Pre-med $100,000
  2. Computer systems engineering $85,000
  3. Pharmacy $84,000
  4. Chemical engineering $80,000
  5. Electrical and electronics engineering $75,000
  6. Mechanical engineering $75,000
  7. Aerospace and aeronautical engineering $74,000
  8. Computer science $73,000
  9. Industrial engineering $73,000
  10. Physics and astronomy $72,200
  11. Civil engineering $70,000
  12. Electrical and electronics engineering technology $65,000
  13. Economics $63,300
  14. Financial management $63,000
  15. Mechanical engineering technology $63,000

Even the non-engineering disciplines in the top 15 are quantitative in nature.  Read the full article here.

Learning from Student Leaders and Junior Enterprise in Brazil

I was an academic for 27.5 years before I left to start ThreeJoy and the Big Beacon, and I’ve been to scores of conferences in a score of countries, but perhaps the coolest conference I ever attended was run by students last week (6-10 August 2012) for students, students who are immersed in giving themselves the educations their formal schooling refuses to provide.

Called JEWC or the Junior Enterprise World Congress (here), 2100 students from around the globe gathered at Paraty, Brazil in the State of Rio De Janeiro south of the city of the same name to celebrate their movement of students creating enterprises or consultorias to provide business services in their disciplines to local business as the royal road to giving themselves the practical education today’s theoretically dominated educational system refuses to provide.

I previously wrote about my interaction with Junior Enterprise at UFMG or Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (post here), and I was prepared to see very cool kids in action, but I wasn’t prepared for the size or scope of the event, the sheer organizational skill required to put on the event, or the professionalism of the student chapters that had gathered from around the world to learn, to be inspired, and to bathe in the collective enthusiasm of their movement.

Two  highlight of the visit for me were the opportunity to meet with student leaders of the movement (picture above) and share the Big Beacon with the students and point out how the Big Beacon is aligned with Junior Enterprise.  The presentation below suggests how Junior Enterprise has its campuses surrounded and now the time has come to move (a) around, (b) inward, and (c) inside to help transform higher education to be aligned with an era that values initiative and courageous action, not passivity and timid acquiescence to the status quo.

[slideshare id=13957903&doc=three-steps-8-2012-pptx-120813084339-phpapp02]

Junior Enterprise started in France in 1967 (see here) and it still has a big footprint in France, Germany, and the Netherlands, but Brasil Junior (here) is the largest Junior Enterprise presence on the planet, and I hope to go back and learn more about this important movement.  Those interested in a model for student-centered and student-run education could do worse than to go to Europe or Brazil and check out Junior Enterprise, today.

Goldberg Named Olin Distinguished Academic Partner

ThreeJoy President and Founder, Dave Goldberg, was recently named a Distinguished Academic Partner of Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering in Needham, MA.  Goldberg co-founded the Ilinois Foundry for Innovation in Engineering Education (here) and the Olin-Illinois Partnership.  Together with Mark Somerville he is the co-founder of the Big Beacon, a global movement to collaboratively disrupt engineering education (here).  Goldberg joins MIT’s Woodie Flowers as the other person so designated (here).

Big Beacon – Sneak Preview for 3J Readers

First campaigns for The Big Beacon, a global movement for the transformation of engineering education, will start next week after Memorial Day.  Readers of ThreeJoy Associates’ blog can get a sneak preview of the Big Beacon website here. The minds, hearts, and hands campaign poster is reproduced below.

Small Mind, Heart, & Hands campaign poster

For more information go to the website (here) or read the Big Beacon Manifesto here.

ThreeJoy at Politecnico Milano

In the following video, ThreeJoy Associates President, Dave Goldberg, presents The Creativity Imperative and the Technology Professional of the Future.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5b_AFu64YQ

The abstract of the presentation is as follows:

The world (1) is apparently flat, (2) is being given over to a rising creative class, and (3) requires a whole new mind, but a common conclusion drawn from authors such as Friedman, Florida, and Pink is that technology professionals in advanced economies must excel at creating new categories of product and service, as returns to routine engineering/technology labor are declining because of the ease with which these tasks may be outsourced. This talk starts by examining the setting after World War 2 that set the stage for engineering and technology education in modern times. It continues by discussing the techno-economic forces that have shaped the intervening period, and it considers recent work by Price and others to understand the essential characteristics and habits of tech visionaries (TVs), those who permit major companies to create value through the effective bootstrapping of entirely new product lines. These and other factors lead to the conclusion that our times demand a greater emphasis on the education and support of creative engineers and technologists, but existing higher educational programs seem unable to reform themselves for a variety of historical and systemic reasons. The talk concludes by discussing some of these difficulties and a number of the organizational, conceptual, and motivational changes that can enable smooth change to the education of more creative engineers and technologists.

The presentation was recorded at Politecnico Milano earlier in the year 12 April 2011 (announcement here).